NOURISHING database’s exciting new look

21 February 2018 | Policy

Bryony Sinclair and Fiona Sing from World Cancer Research Fund International's Policy and Public Affairs team reveal exciting new updates to NOURISHING – our free online policy framework and database.

The NOURISHING policy database has had a refresh to make it easier to search, browse and share the 480 policies and 105 evaluations, from 130 countriesproviding an extensive overview of implemented government actions for policymakers to search. Check out the database’s new look here

You can now search by topic area – for example sugar, sugary drinks, tax, and marketing – as well as by country. Simply start typing a topic and/or country in the search boxes and a list of topics or countries will appear that you can choose from.

 

You can now also refine your search to only show evaluated policies, or only show the latest updates, by ticking the relevant boxes below the search box.

 

We have changed the layout of the database to make it easier to use when browsing a topic. New features include a Topics tag, so you can easily click to see other polices in a Topic area, and a visual aid to remind you where a policy fits within the NOURISHING framework.

 

And we have made it easier to share policies via email, Facebook and Twitter – share with your networks today!

You can try all the new features here

33 new or updated policies and 13 new evaluations

Today's update includes:

  • 26 new implemented government policies
  • Seven updated policies 
  • 13 new evaluations carried out by top research institutions

Highlights of the new evaluations are: Mexico’s junk food tax, Ecuador’s ‘traffic light’ labelling, and Brazil, Canada and South Africa’s salt reduction strategies.

New policies added include Sri Lanka introducing a traffic light labelling system to warn consumers about sugar content and Thailand launching a ban on advertising food for infants.

The Philippines, India, Thailand, and Seattle and San Francisco in the US recently introduced sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) taxes. It is encouraging to see more countries following the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation for fiscal policy. Cook County’s (US) SSB tax has unfortunately been repealed and, as a result, has been removed from the database. Many more SSB taxes are expected this year, so watch this space by signing up to receive updates.

The update incorporates details on different governance structures established in countries to tackle nutrition and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We have added details on Tanzania’s High-level Committee on Nutrition which involves key stakeholders including civil society organisations and multiple government departments that developed the newly launched five-year Multi-sectoral Nutrition Action Plan. We are also starting to add policies relating to urban agriculture, starting with a look at Brazil and Zimbabwe.

Find out more about these policies in our NOURISHING database.

We are now accepting submissions for our next NOURISHING update. Submit your implemented food policy actions before 30 April 2018 to policy@wcrf.org to highlight your country’s progress.

Third United Nations High-Level Meeting on NCDs (HLM3 on NCDs )

2018 is a significant year for accelerating governmental action on NCDs in the lead-up to the HLM3 on NCDs. This year, governments and other stakeholders, in addition to members of civil society, will meet to measure progress towards meeting the global NCD targets in the WHO NCD Global Action Plan and the Sustainable Development Goals, and make stronger commitments to stepping up action on this important issue. At a recent WHO Executive Board meeting, the Director General of the WHO, Dr Tedros, said: "NCDs require implementation, implementation and implementation! Solution is in hand." The NOURISHING framework database provides governments with a crucial resource for these implementation solutions.

It’s time to use NOURISHING to step up the pace on NCDs!

Don’t miss out! Sign up here to receive NOURISHING updates.

Bryony Sinclair, Fiona Sing | 21 February 2018

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